Rushville Republican

March 5, 2013

Snider at The Vogue March 14


Rushville Republican

RUSHVILLE — Todd Snider will perform at 8 p.m. March 14 at the Vogue Theater in Broad Ripple with Chicago Farmer.

Tickets are $22 to $25 and are on sale now at the Vogue Box Office, online at ticketfly.com or charge-by-phone at 877-4-FLY-TIX (435-9849).

The Vogue is located at 6259 N. College Avenue (in the Broad Ripple Village) in Indianapolis. Show is 21+. This is a non-smoking show.

About Todd Snider

Todd Snider, on his new album Agnostic Hymns & Stoner Fables, might carry the mantle of storyteller; it’s what he titled his live record, after all. Agnostic Hymns & Stoner Fables is anything but a nice, folk/Americana troubadour album. Agnostic Hymns & Stoner Fables is Snider’s 12th album (14th, if we count a “best of” set and a collection of B-sides and demos), and it uses its predecessors not as a compass but as a trampoline.

At the album’s outset (“In The Beginning”), Snider credits the church with sustaining peace by noting, “We still need religion to keep the poor from killing the rich.” From there, it’s on to the certainty of warped karma (“Good things happen to bad people,” he sings in “New York Banker”), to a remarkable reworking of “West Nashville Grand Ballroom Gown” (possibly the album’s most acerbic song, and from the pen of Jimmy Buffett), and a slew of stories inspired by the world at large, writ small and barbed, in a manner both penetrating and empathetic. There’s one happy love song, called “Brenda,” about Snider’s favorite couple, Keith Richards and Mick Jagger.

Musically, Snider and co-producer Eric McConnell sought a sound that mirrored the times and that didn’t replicate anything they’d done together. With McConnell on bass and Snider playing guitar and harmonica, they gathered a core band of percussionist Paul Griffith, violinist/vocalist (and gifted songwriter) Amanda Shires, and keyboard player Chad Staehly, along with guest guitarist Jason Isbell and harmony vocalist Mick Utley, and offered up a sonic mission. The result is something disconcerting, cracked and wholly original. It’s something that stands apart from the music of Snider’s heroes, and from Snider’s own, much celebrated past.



- Rushville Republican